War & Peace

Story of Service: Max Missel

Max Missel was born October 18, 1895 in Kovno, Russia (now Kaunas, Lithuania). Five-year old Max came to the United States with his mother Lipsa and his brother Harry in 1900 or 1901 (exact date not determined). They came to join Max’s older brothers John, Samuel, and Abraham who had already established themselves in Boston. The youngest of five sons, Max arrived as a Yiddish-speaking boy. He and his family were part of the wave of Jewish emigration from Eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They left to escape religious persecution and to find a better life.

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Foreword to Volume “Just War Thinkers: From Cicero to the 21st Century”

This book tells the story of the just war through its main protagonists. Each chapter gives insight into the life and times of the most significant just war thinkers. Through these characters we see the tradition grow, evolve, and change over time. We see the tradition as it emerges from ancient and classical roots through the early years of the state system, and eventually to the contemporary post-colonial milieu. We see individuals as well as institutions. Crucially, we see that the just war thinkers do not live in a world of theory. They live in a world where ideas and life experience develop together, where principles often conflict and hard choices must be made.

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A Letter to Andrew Carnegie on the Eve of the Council‘s Centennial

Dear Mr. Carnegie,

As the current president of the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, it is my privilege to report to you on the eve of the 100th anniversary of our founding.

It is not often that we have an opportunity to think in terms of 100 years. It’s a span well-suited to remind us that while our lives are time-bound, our connections endure. And as much as things change, they remain the same.

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Threats Beyond the Headlines

“The Fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” So begins Isaiah Berlin’s essay, “The Hedgehog and Fox.”

One year after September 11, 2001, in the midst of a still evolving “war on terrorism,” it is important to ask: Are we all hedgehogs now? Do we see the world as it relates to this on big idea, the fight against global terror? The possibility of more terrorist attacks looms so large that it inevitably dominates our thoughts—particularly when terrorists themselves are threatening to use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons on civilian targets.

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